The missing New York Times

By Aja Cooper, Staff Writer

Published in print Sept.17, 2014

For a while now, students from UNCG have been able to enjoy the famous news publication we all know as The New York Times.

Located in different newspapers bins around campus, students have enjoyed the luxury of receiving free issues of the prestigious publication courtesy of The New York Times Readership Program.

However things have changed this school year. The New York Times is no longer being distributed on campus and there are many speculations as to why that is and many mixed emotions about the paper’s absence.

Mark Schumacher, a reference correspondent within the Jackson Library has encountered many students in search for the paper and has witnessed the student disappointment firsthand.

“My guess is that it was a financial thing, I think everyone who I encountered loved having them here,” said Schumacher. “Several people were disappointed to learn they weren’t here this year but exactly why that happened, I’m not sure.”

Schumacher expressed that he and his colleagues received an e-mail a couple of weeks ago informing them that hard copies of The New York Times would no longer be available on campus.

He said that without explaining who organized the distributing of the daily news publication, the e-mail stated they weren’t going to be able to do it this year.

Though unaware of the underlying reasons behind the publication’s disappearance, Schumacher jokingly stated, “I would say, if we could figure out who was in charge of it, we should tie them up until they reinstate it.”

Schumacher made it clear that his statement was a little hyperbolic. Even with this being so, his efforts to make light of the situation can be viewed as his wanting to help the students in any way that he can, especially by providing them with the resources they may need to further their education.

The New York Times is very active in its classroom endeavors. Their academic program provides many different opportunities for educators to include the publication in their curriculum.

The paper provides subscriptions to universities, individual instructors and college students who are interested in discounted rates of the publication.

Many professors who decided to incorporate The New York Times within the curriculum now attest that the inclusion was beneficial to the students.

One of the subscription options provided by The New York Times is the Newspaper Readership Program.

The New York Times inEducation website describes the program as one that, “provides copies of The Times in bulk at campus locations, such as residence halls, student centers and academic buildings.”

With The Times previously being present in many locations around campus, this program mirrors the program that was installed here at UNCG.

With close links with UNCG’s Living Learning Communities, students have enjoyed a luxury that many others have not.

Not only were they able to receive free issues of The Times, but students specifically involved in the Living Learning Communities reaped the benefits of the Readership Program in the form of academic passes and webcasts that were made available to them.

Though statements have been up in the air in regards to why the program is no longer present, all fingers seem to point to financial budget cuts that have become all too familiar at UNCG in recent times.       

Though many students were accustomed to the newspaper’s presence and some were required to reference the publication for assignments, students may be comforted by the paper being available on electronic platforms for a subscription fee.



Categories: Features

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