News

GOP leader’s promise on bill to block same-sex marriage

Madison Hoffmann
     Staff Writer

NC House Speaker Tim Moore stated at a news conference in Raleigh that there will never be a state legislative hearing aimed at reversing the U.S. Supreme Court legalization of gay marriage.

 

“There are strong constitutional concerns with this legislation given that the U.S. Supreme Court has firmly ruled on the issue, therefore House Bill 780 will be referred to the House Rules Committee and will not be heard,” Moore said.  

 

Moore released his statement after a bill named “Uphold Historical Marriage Act” was introduced by North Carolina lawmakers. The bill, also referred to as House Bill 780, is modeled after the North Carolina constitution which states that only marriage between a man and a woman “shall be valid or recognized,” nullifying all same sex marriages.  

The primary sponsors of the bill are Republican representatives Larry G. Pittman, Michael Speciale and Carl Ford.

 

Speciale backs the bill in hopes to return North Carolina to its previous state law, before the Supreme Court changed marriage policy.

 

The bill opposes same-sex marriage by arguing, “The ruling of the United States Supreme Court not only exceeds the authority of the Court relative to the State of North Carolina and a vote of the People of the State on an issue pertaining solely to the State of North Carolina…but also exceeds the authority of the Court relative to the decree of Almighty God.”

 

A professor of law at Campbell University, Greg Wallace, reinforced the Supreme Court’s power in an interview with CBS North Carolina.

 

“While people legitimately can disagree with the supreme court’s gay marriage decision, a state legislature cannot overrule the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the federal Constitution,” said Wallace.

The United States Supreme Court 5-4 ruling in 2015 secured the right for same-sex marriage nationwide. Like the North Carolina anti-same-sex marriage bill, there have been a number of deviant acts from other states to get around this proclaimed civil right.

 

The Texas Supreme Court set hearings in a case objecting Houston’s benefit policy for married same-sex couples, while in Alabama, the Supreme Court chief justice was suspended after he ordered state judges to not issue same-sex marriage licenses.

 

HB780 was dropped in the midst of continuing HB2 shambles. The bills go hand in hand in trying to stall momentum for North Carolina’s LGBT community.

 

Shutting down the bill early was a key move in avoiding more bad press for North Carolina.

 

The exact number is unclear, but it’s estimated that HB2 has cost the state over half a billion dollars after the NCAA and ACC championship, NBA All-Star game, and various concerts, events and companies removed themselves from being involved with North Carolina.

 

HB2 has only recently started to make changes in order to bring revenue back to the state. The replacement bill still does not allow local governments to pass their own ordinances until 2020, but reluctantly, the change brought the NCAA to lift its ban on holding championship events in North Carolina.

 

Governor Roy Cooper took to Twitter Tuesday afternoon to share his stance on HB780.

 

“This bill is wrong,” Cooper said. “We need more LGBT protections, not fewer.”

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1 reply »

  1. SCOTUS is not above the Constitution. They have to follow the Constitution as the other two branches. Two Judges performed same sex marriages right before ruling for what they just performed. This is a blatant conflict and the Chief Justice should have demanded that they recuse themselves. Because they did not, this law is null and void. This issue was too large to be ruled for the whole Nation on a blatant conflict of interest. Our Constitution is designed to compare only similar couples for equality, and in this case, did not. This SSM law is actually discriminatory in nature.

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